PortugalPortoMissionfrom1996to2003
Avintes
Avintes is located on the hills on the eastern boarders of the City of Gaia. The major north/south highway passing through one of the valleys cuts Avintes off from the rest of the city of Gaia. Since it is on the edge of the city, much of Avintes has a rural nature. The hills of Avintes overlook a scenic view of a bend in the river Douro.
Avintes is a very old city, founded in 900 AD. It is very well known for the very stout tasting bread that is made here. The bread is made from corn flour rather than wheat. The bread is very heavy, a loaf having the heft like a brick. It usually took the missionaries several months to become accustomed to the taste.
Avintes Chapel
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The chapel in Avintes is an office suite in a building with other offices, shops and apartments. This chapel, like nearly every chapel in Portugal had the white marble plaque with gold letters announcing this is the location of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The missionaries are Elders Ezekiel and Hair.
The post office or "correiros" is one of the most visited building in any city. In Avintes, it is no difference. On this particular day, both Elder Ezekiel and Elder Hair were disappointed because neither received a letter. Correiros in Avintes
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Praša at Avintes
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In the praša at the center of the busines district of Avintes is a statue of a women carrying fresh baked bread to market.
One day I visited the bakery where the Broa de Avintes is made. The owners were very hospitable. This is the mixer they used to stir the very heavy dough. Mixing Broa de Avintes
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Oven in Avintes
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This is a view over the shoulder of one of the workers in the bakery as he withdraws the freshly baked bread from the oven with a wooden spatula. The oven was very large and held many loaves. Upon removal the bread jiggled like it were jelly. When cooled, the bread had the consistency of a brick. The oven was first filled with fire to heat the oven. Then the coals are removed and the bread dough inserted to be cooked by the heat retained in the oven.
This is the stone table in Avintes. Tables made of granite are not uncommon in Portugal. However, the tradition is that this table was an unofficial meeting place for the town fathers since the 1700┤s. In this case the fathers are represented by Elder Hair and President West Stone Table
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